News - 08.09.2015 klo 18.29

PAM does not approve the cuts in Sunday compensations

The Government’s plans to impair the employment terms and employee earnings are fully dismissed by PAM’s President Ann Selin. She finds it totally impossible that in a society based on mutual agreements, the Government should dictate the maximum terms of sectoral collective agreements.

– Collective agreements contain terms on Sunday compensations, overtime, sick leave pay and paid holidays. The Government imposing compelling legislation and dictating the contents of the collective agreements is a violation on the freedom of organisation and as such limits the contractual rights of the parties to the collective agreements. This is in frontal conflict with the Finnish Constitution and the ILO conventions.

Ann Selin also detects a conflict between the current proposals and the need to have more local agreements as mentioned in this Government’s programme.

The Government proposals would mean a 4–6 per cent cut to the earnings of the employees in the service sectors. In the commercial sector, for example, this would translate into about 1,500 less earnings annually. For those part-time employees who work on Sundays, the impairment is proportionally even higher.

– The cuts in Sunday compensations means that the pay increases agreed upon in the employment and growth agreement for coming three years are completely lost. The impact would be about 2–3 per cent, or about 750 euro annually.

Ann Selin insists that the Government reconsider its proposal on the Sunday compensations. She fears that touching these compensations, very important to the service sector employees, may influence attitudes in a negative way.

The Government motivates these cuts by saying that this is an absolute financial necessity.  Ann Selin does not believe this; instead she finds this is a political outline taken by this Government.

– The Government conducts a hard policy to please the employers. For employees, this is a brutal attack. How are these measures supposed to improve employment figures?