Edited: 13.05.2019 - 08:54

Keywords: Employment terms and conditions, Young people, Working life

Summer job checklist

It is advisable to remember a few facts about working life and working before you start a summer job. There are obligations, but in return employees also have many rights.

1. Are you going to an interview? – guidance for jobseekers

It pays to prepare thoroughly for an interview. Employers generally choose interview candidates on the basis of their written job applications. Employers use interviews to find out more about applicants’ skills and suitability for the job on offer and to see whether the impression of the person they got from the job application was correct.
The interview is used to find out what the applicant is like as a person, what interpersonal skills they have and whether they are genuinely interested in the job they are applying for.

2. When you start working

Become a member of PAM: then you will be sure of the services of the shop steward at your workplace and of the union, if questions arise in your employment relationship or if you need help. You also build up your employment condition for earnings-related benefits in case you become unemployed. You build up your employment condition for every working week in which you have worked at least 18 hours. Join here or call 030 100 600.
Tax card: take it to your employer on your first day of work. You can get a tax card from the tax office (www.vero.fi) and it is generally also posted to your home.
Employment contract: best to have it in writing and sign it. Later on you can check what has been agreed.
Collective agreement: check that your pay is in line with the collective agreement. You can find the collective agreements here.
Work shifts: keep a record of your shifts. It is easier to check your wages, supplements, overtime and holiday compensation when you keep track of your shifts.
More information on shift rosters in the retail sector
More information on shift rosters in the hospitality sector
Introduction: employers are obliged to provide guidance, for example on workplace conditions, operational procedures for machinery or equipment and occupational safety. 

3. When you are at work

Illness: if your employment has lasted for over a month, you are legally entitled to full pay on the day you fall ill and for the nine following working days. If your employment has lasted less than a month, check your entitlement to pay in the collective agreement that applies in your job.
Shift roster: a scheduled shift roster cannot be changed without the consent of both the employee and the employer.
Extra hours: part-time employees are entitled to extra hours if offered. If you work part-time, for example 4 hours instead of a full 8 hours and your employer needs extra workers, it is their obligation to first of all offer extra hours to part-time workers. 
Occupational safety: employers are required to ensure that work does not cause any danger to your health or safety.
Heat: it is the employer’s obligation to ensure that the temperature remains below 28 °C when the outside temperature is over 25 °C. Failing that, extra breaks have to be provided. If the temperature is below 33 °C, work is done for 50 min, followed by a 10 min break. If the temperature is above 33 °C, work is done for 45 min, followed by a break of 15 min.

4. When your job ends

Testimonial: The employee is entitled to receive a written employment certificate for their job. Under the law, employers must provide a testimonial for up to ten years after the end of employment.
Annual holiday or compensation for annual holiday: Summer workers are also entitled to annual holiday or compensation for annual holiday. Compensation for annual holiday is paid if you do not or cannot take holiday. Remember to check your holiday pay on your pay slip.
Check your pay slips: if you suspect that your wages have not been paid correctly or supplements have not been paid at all, you can check your pay in the collective agreement. As a member you can also contact PAM’s employment advice service on tel. 030 100 620. You can calculate the correct minimum wage for the retail sector and hospitality service sectors using the Tarkistapalkka.fi calculator (in Finnish).

Read more

Guide Ready to work 
For many sectors there is a specific summer placement programme for school pupils (In Finnish)

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